Brain Dynamics Laboratory

Current Research

Interested in participating in a scientific study? Want to know what’s happening in your brain? Looking to join our research team or conduct research using our resources? You’ve come to the right page.

Current Research Projects:

Project Loneliness

Are you feeling lonely or isolated?

Research Participants needed for a research study at the University of Chicago. Men ages 21-80 (inclusive) only. Compensation: Up to $60 + parking vouchers and coverage of CTA transportation. If you are a male feeling alone or isolated from your peers, you may qualify for a single visit study about how your feelings change after a single dose of a drug called Pregnenolone. Duration of the visit at the University of Chicago: Between 4 hours and 4 ½ hours. If you are interested, please fill out our screening survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/loneliness.

Project Desire

Are you a woman who is not pregnant? Are you between 50-74 years old? You may qualify for our study on female desire. If interested, fill out this short survey, email us at braindynamics@uchicago.edu or call us at (773) 834-5264. If you qualify, you will be eligible for up to $25 for an hour of your time.

Project 322

If you are a woman, are not pregnant, and have low sexual desire, you may qualify for our study, Project 322. Female volunteers are needed to test an investigational drug, Flibanserin. There are 3 visits and 2 phone calls over the period of 2 months. There is up to $125 of compensation. If interested, please fill out this survey. If you have any questions or concerns, email us at braindynamics@uchicago.edu or call us at (773) 834-5264.

Health Disparities in Relationships, Well-Being, and Brain Dynamics Project

Currently closed to new participants. This study aims to examine the loneliness (perceived social isolation) among sexual and underrepresented minorities, and prevent the development of PSI.

CHASRS

The purpose of the National Institute of Aging funded CHASRS is to bring together sociological, psychological, and biological levels of analyses to bear on the relationships among, and mechanisms underlying, social isolation, feelings of loneliness, health, and the aging process. Social relationships are fundamental to emotional fulfillment, behavioral adjustment, and cognitive function. Recent research has shown that emotional closeness in relationships increases with age. Yet the number of social relationships decreases and social events triggering loneliness continue in older adults. Moreover, they are physically aging and tend to be less resilient so these psychosocial challenges could potentially leave them vulnerable to feelings of loneliness, dysphoria, elevated and prolonged neuroendocrine stress responses, and ill health. Feelings of social isolation and loneliness predict morbidity and mortality from broad based causes in later life even after controlling for health behaviors and biological risk factors. Understanding the antecedents of feelings of loneliness and their consequences for mental and physical health can thus be studied effectively in older adults and is particularly important because life expectancy has increased in the U.S., increasing dramatically the number of older adults.Funding from the National Institute of Aging has made it possible to study these issues in an interdisciplinary manner. Medical scientists, social scientists, behavioral scientists, and medical practitioners (e.g., geriatricians) work collaboratively under the auspices of the program project grant. The grants have also contributed to the development of new investigators (both M.D.s and Ph.D.s) in whose hands the future of the field rests. We, therefore, gratefully acknowledge the early funding by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the ongoing support by the National Institute of Aging, and the ancillary funding by the John Templeton Foundation.The Program Project Grant from the National Institute of Aging has made it possible to study these issues in an interdisciplinary manner. Medical scientists, social scientists, behavioral scientists, and medical practitioners (e.g., geriatricians) work collaboratively under the auspices of the program project grant. The Program Project Grant has also contributed to the development of new investigators (both M.D.s and Ph.D.s) in whose hands the future of the field rests. We, therefore, gratefully acknowledge the early funding by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the ongoing support by the National Institute of Aging.

If you are interested in joining our research team, please email us at braindynamics@uchicago.edu or fill out this contact form

Brain Dynamics Research Program:

 

As a scientific research hub, the Brain Dynamics laboratory provides new opportunities for CCSN members interested in high-density EEG data collection. CCSN supports EEG/ERP research by Center members by providing the equipment, technical training and support, and supply costs.  The Brain Dynamics Laboratory has been established to support this initiative at the University of Chicago.

Researchers, who would like to perform scientific projects at the Brain Dynamics Laboratory, should complete and submit the following forms:

1. APPLICATION FORM

2. FINANCIAL STUDY FORM

Details about application procedure and review process can be found in the page below:

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR FORMS

Application forms need to be submitted to braindynamics@uchicago.edu  by the 15th of each month to permit time for the Review Committee to complete their reviews before Review Committee meets.

When submitting your application forms, please also include a copy of the approval letter you received from IRB.

When emailing your forms, please include your initials and date in your file name (e.g., XX_HPapplicationform_82514.doc).

One CCSN financial study form needs to be filled out by the Principal Investigator and emailed to the Brain Dynamics lab director (braindynamics@uchicago.edu), at least three weeks before the beginning of the study.

This form will be reviewed by the Brain Dynamics Lab Director, and needs to be approved before you can start scanning any participants.

REVIEW PROCESS

Once your application has been received, you will receive an e-notice of reception within 48 hours. If you don’t receive it, please contact braindynamics@uchicago.edu.

Then, you will be invited to present your research project in person at one of the Brain Dynamics Scientific Review Committee Review Sessions.

The Brain Dynamics Scientific Review Committee reviews research projects from 1:00-3:00 pm each first Monday of the month.

The goal of the Brain Dynamics Scientific Review Committee is mainly to clarify the feasibility, design and resources needed to your research project – that is, to make constructive suggestions and to ensure adherence to the technical procedures required of studies in the Brain Dynamics Laboratory. 

GUIDELINES FOR PRESENTERS

Each research project presentation should be 10 minutes maximum with discussion, and concern only one single study (not a whole research program), if possible, with 1-2 Powerpoint slides for each of the following points:

  • Title, principal investigator, EEG operator, collaborators, IRB#
  • Brief background and previous scientific studies
  • Preliminary data, if any 
  • Aims of current study
  • Experimental design, conditions, outline and number of trials
  • Technical parameters (e.g., EEG number of trials, timing)
  • Sample size
  • Data collection stopping rule
  • Methods of analyses, planned comparisons (e.g. Contrasts)
  • Predictions (e.g. timing, and brain areas activated in respective conditions)
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